USA Coronavirus (COVID-19) Case Tracker

Data Last updated on May 31, 2020

Total Cases
1,759,693Increase of 1.33%
Total Deceased
97,880Increase of 1.02%
Mortality Rate
5.56%Increase of -0.02%
🠮 See Coronavirus Cases by State

Projected Daily COVID-19 Deaths

  • Daily Deaths
  • Projected High
  • Projected Mean
  • Projected Low
Data Source: The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Reopening the US Economy

  • Reopening Status:
  • Shut Down / Restricted
  • Reopening Soon
  • Partial Reopening

Daily Positive Cases

Daily Deaths

Map of Total Cases of Covid-19 in the US

  • Total cases:
  • < 100
  • 100 - 1,000
  • 1,000 - 10,000
  • 10,000 - 100,000
  • > 100,000

United States Coronavirus Cases by State

State Total Cases New Cases Cases / 100k Deaths New Deaths Deaths / 100k Mortality
Alaska 434 4 59 10 0 1.4 2.3%
Alabama 17,359 536 354 618 13 12.6 3.6%
Arkansas 7,013 475 232 133 8 4.4 1.9%
Arizona 19,255 790 265 903 18 12.4 4.7%
California 106,878 2,992 270 4,156 88 10.5 3.9%
Colorado 25,613 492 445 1,436 15 24.9 5.6%
Connecticut 42,022 260 1,179 3,912 44 109.7 9.3%
District of Columbia 8,717 179 1,235 462 2 65.5 5.3%
Delaware 9,422 186 968 361 5 37.1 3.8%
Florida 55,424 927 258 2,530 35 11.8 4.6%
Georgia 46,286 616 436 2,003 29 18.9 4.3%
Hawaii 649 2 46 17 0 1.2 2.6%
Iowa 19,244 318 610 531 9 16.8 2.8%
Idaho 2,803 34 157 82 0 4.6 2.9%
Illinois 118,917 1,462 938 5,330 60 42.1 4.5%
Indiana 34,211 653 508 2,125 15 31.6 6.2%
Kansas 9,719 0 334 208 0 7.1 2.1%
Kentucky 9,464 280 212 418 9 9.4 4.4%
Louisiana 39,577 775 851 2,785 19 59.9 7.0%
Massachusetts 96,301 789 1,386 6,768 50 97.4 7.0%
Maryland 52,015 1,027 860 2,509 43 41.5 4.8%
Maine 2,282 56 170 89 4 6.6 3.9%
Michigan 56,884 263 570 5,463 57 54.7 9.6%
Minnesota 24,190 659 429 1,036 30 18.4 4.3%
Missouri 12,962 167 211 771 33 12.6 5.9%
Mississippi 15,229 439 512 723 13 24.3 4.7%
Montana 505 12 47 17 0 1.6 3.4%
North Carolina 27,673 1,185 264 877 18 8.4 3.2%
North Dakota 2,554 34 335 60 1 7.9 2.3%
Nebraska 13,654 393 706 170 6 8.8 1.2%
New Hampshire 4,492 106 330 238 6 17.5 5.3%
New Jersey 159,608 764 1,797 11,634 103 131.0 7.3%
New Mexico 7,493 129 357 344 9 16.4 4.6%
Nevada 8,495 145 276 417 7 13.5 4.9%
New York 369,660 1,376 1,900 23,848 68 122.6 6.5%
Ohio 35,034 468 300 2,149 18 18.4 6.1%
Oklahoma 6,418 80 162 334 5 8.4 5.2%
Oregon 4,185 54 99 153 2 3.6 3.7%
Pennsylvania 72,031 692 563 5,537 73 43.3 7.7%
Rhode Island 14,819 184 1,399 711 18 67.1 4.8%
South Carolina 11,394 263 221 487 4 9.5 4.3%
South Dakota 4,960 94 561 62 3 7.0 1.3%
Tennessee 22,566 481 330 364 4 5.3 1.6%
Texas 61,006 0 210 1,626 0 5.6 2.7%
United States 1,759,693 23,122 536 97,880 989 29.8 5.6%
Utah 9,533 269 297 112 5 3.5 1.2%
Virginia 43,611 1,078 511 1,370 12 16.1 3.1%
Vermont 977 2 157 55 0 8.8 5.6%
Washington 21,071 307 277 1,111 5 14.6 5.3%
Wisconsin 18,230 523 313 588 20 10.1 3.2%
West Virginia 1,974 23 110 75 1 4.2 3.8%
Wyoming 898 7 155 16 1 2.8 1.8%
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Daily Coronavirus Tests

Cumulative Cases Over Time

Cumulative Deaths over time

Coronavirus Background

The coronavirus (COVID-19) is an illness caused by a virus that is spread from one person to another. It is believed that the virus emerged from the city of Wuhan, China and has since caused a large scale epidemic, spreading to virtually every country in the world. The virus has infected more than 3 million people worldwide and has killed more than 220,000 people.

COVID-19 can be spread by coming into contact with anyone currently infected with the virus. It is generally believed that the virus can infect anyone who comes within 6 feet or a carrier from respiratory droplets. It is also believed that the virus can be passed by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, then by touching your eyes, mouth or nose.

There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19, but there are ways to reduce your risk of infection. The first recommendation is to stay home and avoid contact with others. This is the best way to prevent yourself from getting the virus. If you are leaving your home, be sure to wear gloves as well as something to cover your nose and mouth. Cleaning and disinfecting any surfaces that have been touched outside of your home is also good practice as is washing your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water.

Although for most people the risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus is believed to be low. People with underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease have a higher mortality risk. Overall, the mortality risk for all known infected cases is approximately 6.9%.