USA Coronavirus (COVID-19) Case Tracker

Data Last updated on Apr 22, 2021

Total Cases
28,756,489Increase of 0.15%
Total Deceased
515,151Increase of 0.16%
Mortality Rate
1.79%Increase of 0.00%
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Daily Positive Cases

Daily Deaths

Map of Total Cases of Covid-19 in the US

  • Total cases:
  • < 100
  • 100 - 1,000
  • 1,000 - 10,000
  • 10,000 - 100,000
  • > 100,000

United States Coronavirus Cases by State

State Total Cases New Cases Cases / 100k Deaths New Deaths Deaths / 100k Mortality
Alaska 56,886 0 7,776 305 0 41.7 0.5%
Alabama 499,819 408 10,194 10,148 -1 207.0 2.0%
Arkansas 324,818 165 10,763 5,319 22 176.3 1.6%
Arizona 826,454 1,335 11,354 16,328 5 224.3 2.0%
California 3,501,394 3,816 8,862 54,124 258 137.0 1.5%
Colorado 436,602 840 7,582 5,989 3 104.0 1.4%
Connecticut 285,330 0 8,003 7,704 0 216.1 2.7%
District of Columbia 41,419 146 5,869 1,030 0 145.9 2.5%
Delaware 88,354 215 9,073 1,473 9 151.3 1.7%
Florida 1,909,209 4,024 8,889 32,266 66 150.2 1.7%
Georgia 1,023,487 1,709 9,640 17,906 1 168.6 1.7%
Hawaii 28,699 53 2,027 445 1 31.4 1.6%
Iowa 282,384 257 8,950 5,558 6 176.2 2.0%
Idaho 172,931 104 9,677 1,879 3 105.1 1.1%
Illinois 1,198,335 1,068 9,457 23,014 12 181.6 1.9%
Indiana 667,262 746 9,911 12,737 11 189.2 1.9%
Kansas 295,861 0 10,155 4,812 0 165.2 1.6%
Kentucky 410,709 525 9,193 4,819 13 107.9 1.2%
Louisiana 433,785 740 9,331 9,748 32 209.7 2.2%
Massachusetts 591,356 1,425 8,509 16,417 43 236.2 2.8%
Maryland 387,319 709 6,407 7,955 14 131.6 2.1%
Maine 45,794 159 3,407 706 2 52.5 1.5%
Michigan 656,072 0 6,569 16,658 0 166.8 2.5%
Minnesota 490,011 895 8,689 6,550 4 116.1 1.3%
Missouri 480,643 291 7,831 8,161 0 133.0 1.7%
Mississippi 297,581 260 9,999 6,808 3 228.8 2.3%
Montana 100,914 72 9,442 1,381 0 129.2 1.4%
North Carolina 872,176 0 8,316 11,502 0 109.7 1.3%
North Dakota 100,391 34 13,174 1,478 0 193.9 1.5%
Nebraska 203,026 373 10,496 2,113 0 109.2 1.0%
New Hampshire 76,861 166 5,653 1,184 3 87.1 1.5%
New Jersey 812,609 2,519 9,149 23,574 17 265.4 2.9%
New Mexico 186,922 180 8,915 3,808 12 181.6 2.0%
Nevada 296,190 730 9,616 5,037 1 163.5 1.7%
New York 1,681,169 6,789 8,642 39,029 59 200.6 2.3%
Ohio 978,471 735 8,371 17,656 0 151.0 1.8%
Oklahoma 428,997 461 10,842 4,534 0 114.6 1.1%
Oregon 157,079 195 3,724 2,296 3 54.4 1.5%
Pennsylvania 948,643 1,658 7,410 24,349 32 190.2 2.6%
Rhode Island 128,781 265 12,156 2,547 0 240.4 2.0%
South Carolina 525,865 1,408 10,214 8,754 35 170.0 1.7%
South Dakota 113,589 211 12,840 1,900 2 214.8 1.7%
Tennessee 782,206 0 11,447 11,543 0 168.9 1.5%
Texas 2,686,818 2,953 9,266 44,451 84 153.3 1.7%
United States 28,756,489 41,835 8,761 515,151 842 156.9 1.8%
Utah 374,850 412 11,692 1,976 1 61.6 0.5%
Virginia 585,700 1,163 6,862 9,596 77 112.4 1.6%
Vermont 16,083 119 2,577 208 0 33.3 1.3%
Washington 344,532 664 4,524 5,041 0 66.2 1.5%
Wisconsin 621,654 377 10,677 7,106 4 122.0 1.1%
West Virginia 133,445 155 7,446 2,325 2 129.7 1.7%
Wyoming 54,764 0 9,462 682 0 117.8 1.2%
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Daily Coronavirus Tests

Cumulative Cases Over Time

Cumulative Deaths over time

Coronavirus Background

The coronavirus (COVID-19) is an illness caused by a virus that is spread from one person to another. It is believed that the virus emerged from the city of Wuhan, China and has since caused a large scale epidemic, spreading to virtually every country in the world. The virus has infected more than 3 million people worldwide and has killed more than 220,000 people.

COVID-19 can be spread by coming into contact with anyone currently infected with the virus. It is generally believed that the virus can infect anyone who comes within 6 feet or a carrier from respiratory droplets. It is also believed that the virus can be passed by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, then by touching your eyes, mouth or nose.

There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19, but there are ways to reduce your risk of infection. The first recommendation is to stay home and avoid contact with others. This is the best way to prevent yourself from getting the virus. If you are leaving your home, be sure to wear gloves as well as something to cover your nose and mouth. Cleaning and disinfecting any surfaces that have been touched outside of your home is also good practice as is washing your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water.

Although for most people the risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus is believed to be low. People with underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease have a higher mortality risk. Overall, the mortality risk for all known infected cases is approximately 6.9%.