Answer this question about Denver Be specific and detailed. Share your personal experience or knowledge.
Answer a question
philly to colorado Hey all, first off, thanks so much for reading this and your efforts to lead me in the right direction! I currently live in philadelphia, and am visiting the Denver/Fort Collins area at the end of the month for the first time with strong interests in moving when my lease is up in the spring here in Philadelphia. A bit about myself, I am 27 and would be moving on my own to Colorado. I love the outdoors (hiking, water, yoga, etc.) and practice and appreciate living a holistic and happy lifestyle. I would ideally like to be in a central location where I have the mountains and outdoor activities at my fingertips but also in an area where I can easily meet plenty of new friends and network as I do not know many people out in Colorado. I am looking to spend hopefully no more than $700/month on rent and would ideally love to be in an area that people with similar lifestyles live as well. So, a few questions I have... Any suggestions/neighborhoods in denver I can check out on my visit? or outside of the denver area that share the same qualities i'm looking for in a new home? I hear boulder is great, but may be a bit out of my price range! Can anyone suggest a hotel/bed & breakfast that is affordable and centrally located in an area of denver that I can check out for my stay at the end of the month? Again, thanks so much and I hope to get some feedback!
  • Report
lryanj27Posted on Feb 08, 2013

Answers

...(continued) and full of history, beauty, uniqueness and fun. I am so happy every day I wake up here knowing this is home! Anytime I leave to visit another state, I long to be back in Colorado within a day or two!
  • Report
DenveritePosted on May 19, 2013
...(continued) Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park areas are nice too and have some more affordable housing options. Parking is a nightmare though, so look for a place with a parking spot or you'll be battling it out on the street every day (assuming you have a car). Speaking of cars, in retrospect I wish I wouldn't have bought a new car right before moving to Denver because the central part is so walkable and the Light Rail is also there for commuting farther destinations. Having a car is almost more of a pain than a convenience (I mostly drive only to work and to the mountains on the weekends). Biking is a great option... if you don't have a bike, there is the B-Cycle bike sharing program which is very affordable (free if you ride under 30 minutes) and a great way to get some exercise while getting around. The Cherry Creek bike trail goes through downtown all the way to the Cherry Creek neighborhood area (very nice but VERY pricey!), through to Aurora and ends at the Cherry Creek Reservoir about 12 miles from downtown Denver. The Western Slope is a whole different world from the Front Range (where all the places I mentioned so far are) and could be where you'd want to find yourself instead. It's generally more expensive because everywhere is desirable with mountain views and rivers and lakes all around. Dillon, Breckenridge, Buena Vista, Glenwood Springs, Telluride and Durango are all really cool mountain towns. I personally prefer to visit than live there, but some people are the opposite. Wherever you end up in Colorado will be amazing. The whole state is wonderful and
  • Report
DenveritePosted on May 19, 2013
Hello, I'm not sure about hotels, but as far as places to live - try Longmont, which is near Boulder but less expensive - great place if you like to ride bikes, shop at farmers markets and drink beer. Kind of a small cow town, really laid back, claim to fame is two if Colorado's best breweries - Oskar Blues and Left Hand; Morrison, which is closer to Denver but still in the foothills, great trails and the Red Rocks amphitheater; or the west side of Colorado Springs or Manitou Springs - lots of outdoor activities, Pikes Peak and Garden of the Gods right there, shops and places that support holistic living, only downside is not many water activities are available. Housing is more affordable in these areas than in the other towns I mentioned. They are close to super-conservative Colorado Springs, but the west side of Colorado Springs to Manitou Springs are a very sharp contrast to that and are much more liberal and open-minded. Plus it's not a far drive to the southern mountain ranges of Colorado which are stunning! Denver, where I live, is great and has lots of diversity and is also still close to the mountains, but the only thing you'll get for $700 or under is a studio apartment unless you find a great deal. In which case, beware of things like bed bugs, sewer backups, loud/smelly restaurants nearby, etc that would explain why it's so cheap! Just be aware, housing is in high demand and very expensive with lots of competition even for crappy little apartments in the desirable neighborhoods . The Highlands neighborhood is very nice, so is Lower Downtown and Washington Park
  • Report
DenveritePosted on May 19, 2013
Reason for reporting